Monthly Archives: February 2018

Kourtney Kardashian Weighs 98 Lbs. Here’s Why That’s Not Necessarily a Bad Thing

In a deleted scene from Sunday’s episode of Keeping Up With the Kardashians, we learned that a short woman weighs a small amount. When you put it that way, it doesn't sound so shocking, right?

Here's how it actually unfolded:

Khloé tells friend Simon Gebrelul, “You know she’s 97 lbs.?” about her older sis Kourtney.

“Guess what? I gained a pound,” Kourtney chimes in. “I’m 98.”

Perhaps forgetting that Kourtney stands a mere 5 feet tall, reactions on Twitter ranged from “OMG I want to be her” to “OMG that can’t be healthy,” with a sprinkle or two of “OMG why is this news?”

In a way, everyone's kinda right.

“People aren’t used to seeing weights under 100 pounds, and I think that’s triggering for a lot of people,” says dietitian and educator Claudia T. Felty, PhD, RD. In general, she says, we all need to take a deep breath and a big step back from being so quick to judge others by the numbers on their scales.

RELATED: 16 Weight Loss Secrets of the Kardashians

Aside from it simply not being a friendly thing to do, “the number on the scale tells us very little about the overall health and wellness of a person,” says certified eating disorder registered dietitian Marjorie Nolan Cohn, RDN. “Bodyweight is just one (relatively small) variable we use to determine someone’s overall health and disease risk. It doesn’t tell us anything about one’s genetic risk factors, cardiovascular health, immune health, bone health, or hormonal balance.”

The number on the scale also varies greatly with our own individual packaging, so to speak—which in Kourtney's case is small. She revealed in a 2015 Instagram post (which also garnered lots of commentary about her weight) that she is only 5 feet tall. While 98 pounds may be unimaginable for most of us non-Kardashians, it’s not outrageous for someone of this size. “Depending on bone structure, muscle mass, and genetics, a range for healthy women of 5 feet could be anywhere from the low 90s to the 120s,” Cohn says.

Reshmi Srinath, MD, director of the weight and metabolism management program at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, says she typically looks at a person’s BMI or body mass index rather than just the number on the scale—and even those don't provide a perfect measure. “BMI is a standardized measure of height compared to weight, and using that, I can characterize someone as normal weight, underweight, or reaching obesity,” she explains.

RELATED: The Best and Worst Ways to Calculate Body Fat

Current guidelines suggest that someone with a BMI over 25 is considered overweight. Over 30 and you're considered obese, while you'd fall into the underweight category if you clock in under 18.5. At her height and weight, Kourtney comes in at a low but still healthy 19 or so, Dr. Srinath says. But someone who has a lot of muscle mass—which weighs more than fat and would therefore raise BMI score—could be easily miscategorized as obese, Cohn says. Meanwhile, someone with very little protective muscle mass could be classified as meeting a healthy weight, despite a greater risk for certain conditions.

Emerging research suggests that measuring a person’s waist circumference and comparing it to the size of her hips—the waist-to-hip ratio—may be even more telling. “We know that people who have greater waist circumferences have greater risk of heart disease and metabolic syndrome,” says Dr. Srinath, also an associate professor of endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. That’s because it’s the so-called visceral abdominal fat (otherwise known as belly fat) that seems to pose the biggest risk to our health.

Felty recommends ditching the scale entirely. “I focus on intuitive eating, becoming more in touch with your own body,” she says. “I look at energy levels, food and exercise behaviors, and use that intuitive process to learn what your body needs, which often helps stabilize weight naturally.”

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For everyone who was quick to judge Kourtney’s weight—or anyone’s, for that matter—remember that every person is unique. “We all have different curves,” Dr. Srinath says, and a fair amount of curviness comes from genetic factors, meaning it’s out of your control. Whatever your weight is, don’t spend another second comparing it to Kourtney's.

“Look at our furry friends,” Felty suggests. “We would never expect a Chihuahua to look like a St. Bernard. We have different genetics, different builds—we’re all individuals.”

Source: http://www.health.com

How to Lose Weight on a Part-Time Diet

You know what dieting demands: cut calories, go hard on veggies, exercise, and repeat, well, forever. But what if you could hit pause on dieting once in a while, but still reap weight-loss benefits?

That’s the premise of part-time diets. “ ‘Part-time dieting’ is an umbrella term for eating styles that let you be flexible with the hours, days, even weeks that you cut calories,” explains Courtney Peterson, PhD, assistant professor in the department of nutrition sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. And recent research is starting to uncover how different methods may make it easier to shed pounds and improve health.

No, dieting part-time doesn’t mean you can go crazy on burgers and fries when you’re not watching your calories as closely—and there’s no one-size-fits-all plan. Here, our experts dive into ways you can try this trend and how to customize it just for you.

The fasting-mimicking diet

Despite the name, the fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) doesn’t actually involve fasting. You restrict your calorie intake for five consecutive days, every three to four months, on average. The evidence behind the method: In a clinical trial, when healthy adults did FMD (eating around 1,100 calories on the first day, and about 750 calories on days two, three, four, and five) once a month for three months, they saw drops in body weight, total body fat, and blood pressure, while the people who followed a normal diet did not. How does it work? FMD puts the body in a fat-burning, ketogenic mode over the "fasting" period, explains Valter Longo, PhD, professor and director of the Longevity Institute at the University of Southern California and author of the new book The Longevity Diet ($27; amazon.com). "The average healthy adult can do an FMD cycle a few times a year and reap the benefits,” says Longo, who worked on the aforementioned trial. The caveat: Any diet that involves fasting or major eating changes is not recommended for pregnant or breastfeeding women. And it’s always a good idea to talk to your doc before making significant diet changes.

Time-restricted feeding

The time-restricted feeding (TRF) concept is simple: Narrow the window when you consume food. A recent small study conducted by Peterson with the Louisiana State University’s Pennington Biomedical Research Center suggests that eating within a six-hour window may boost fat burn. Two other small studies found that even eating meals within an eight-hour period may promote fat loss. If this narrow time frame sounds like a freaky fad diet, don’t worry—Peterson says that a 10-hour window, like 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., is very doable and still works.

Keep in mind that shifting your entire meal schedule can be a tricky behavioral change. “Fasting isn’t for everyone,” says Stephanie Middleberg, RD, owner of Middleberg Nutrition in New York City. “I am a fan of people working on eating less at night. Even stretching your fasting period from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m. could have tremendous benefits.”

Two-week cycling

A study in the International Journal for Obesity found that obese men who dieted two weeks on, then two weeks off for 30 weeks lost more weight than those who dieted continuously. These intermittent dieters kept the weight off for the long term, too. The mechanism at play isn’t totally clear, but it’s possible that “the body may not fully adapt to intermittent dieting in a way that would permanently slow down your metabolism,” Peterson says.

You don’t even have to do two-week cycles. "We don’t know at this point what the ideal schedule is," Peterson notes. “To a degree, I think the scheduling depends on the person and her preferences.” So if, say, one week on, two weeks off seems more realistic for you, it’s fine to tweak the format to fit your needs. Peterson recommends giving it a couple of months for your body to adapt.

Before you try this on-off strategy, remember this: You can’t eat whatever you want during your no-dieting period. "Consuming 5,000 calories just because it’s a ‘free’ week is not efficient. You still want to think about filling your body with whole foods," says Jennifer Cholewka, RD, senior clinical dietitian at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

Going vegan… until dinner

Popularized by the book Eat Vegan Before 6:00, by Mark Bittman, this scenario eliminates all animal products and focuses on eating vegan protein sources, vegetables, whole grains, and healthy fats until your evening meal. Plus, swapping animal protein for vegan sources slashes calories and saturated fat and has real weightloss potential. "When my clients break from consuming animal protein at all meals, they also realize how full they get when reintroducing it, so they often have a lot less at one sitting," Middleberg says.

On the flip side, she points out that you need to make sure you’re still getting enough protein, carbs, and fat during the day so you aren’t ravenous at dinner and end up overeating.

The 5:2 diet

This plan is named after a book by the same name. (Benedict Cumberbatch and Jimmy Kimmel have both tried it.) A few studies have linked the regimen—which calls for eating normally five days of the week and only 25 percent of your typical calorie intake for two days of your choice—to weight loss and lower insulin levels. “If I were to try any part-time diet, the 5:2 plan would be my pick,” says Cholewka.

"You’re responsible for remembering your eating schedule and keeping an eye on calorie counts, but you aren’t burdened by strict food lists." However, keep in mind that, as your body adjusts, you may feel the effects of hunger more acutely, she adds.

Worried that severe restriction will get to you? Peterson reversed the plan a bit for herself. "In the past, when I lost weight, I did an approach where five days a week I would cut down about 15 percent of my calories," she explains. "Then I would eat healthy but normal for two days each week."

Source: http://www.health.com

704-Lb. Woman Goes for Weight Loss Surgery After Finding Maggots in the Folds of Her Skin

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Lisa Fleming was already overweight when she gave birth to her first child at 15, and her weight only went up from there. But she knew it was absolutely time to make a change when, bedridden and weighing 704 lbs., she found maggots in the folds of her skin.

For the first time in years, Fleming, 49, is going to leave her bed — the same bed where her mom died due to obesity — and make the six-hour trip to get weight loss surgery.

“I’m tired, I’m hungry, and I’m not looking forward to having the paramedics move me out of this bed,” Fleming says in this exclusive clip from Wednesday’s episode of My 600-Lb. Life. “Lord, give me strength.”

Seven paramedics arrive with multiple emergency vehicles to get Fleming out of her bed, down a ramp and into an ambulance.

“The paramedics have to reinforce the ramp they’ll use to get me out of the house,” she says. “I can’t believe it’s come to this. But at least I’m doing something about it before it gets to be too late.”

And when they ask Fleming if she’s ready to go, she says that she “ain’t ever gonna be ready,” but tells them to go for it, because she knows “for a fact” that she’s “sick of this damn bed.”

Using her bed sheets and a dolly, the paramedics painfully lift Fleming out of her bed.

“Oh lord, please don’t let them kill me,” she says.

My 600-Lb. Life airs Wednesdays at 8/7c on TLC.

Source: http://www.health.com

Comparing low-fat and low-carb diets finds little difference

Researchers have studied the effects of a low fat versus and low carbohydrate diet over one year in overweight and obese individuals and come up with some insights into their genetic makeup as well as responses to these diets.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Cutting either carbs or fats shaves off excess weight in the same proportion, study reveals

New evidence from a study at the Stanford University School of Medicine might dismay those who have chosen sides in the low-fat versus low-carb diet debate.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Persistent bloating can be a sign of ovarian cancer, warns charity

The charity Target Ovarian Cancer that there is an “alarmingly low rate of awareness” among women that persistent bloating is a major symptom of ovarian cancer.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Study: Diagnosis of celiac disease takes 3.5 years for patients who do not report GI symptoms

It takes an average of 3.5 years to diagnose celiac disease in patients who do not report gastrointestinal symptoms, a Loyola Medicine study has found.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

People Who Lost a Combined 6,818 Lbs. Struggle with Excess Skin on My 600-Lb. Life: Skin Tight

Losing hundreds of pounds is tough enough, but for many people it comes with the added complication of excess skin. That challenge is the focus of My 600-Lb. Life: Skin Tight, which starts its third season on March 7.

This season features 29 people who have lost a whopping total of 6,818 lbs. But instead of celebrating their accomplishment, many are frustrated with the loose layer of skin covering their bodies.

“My skin makes me look like a circus freak,” says one woman in this exclusive clip from the new season.

“It looks like I’ve melted,” adds a man.

“This extra skin is a punishment worse than death,” says another woman.

“I lost 320 lbs., but I’m still reminded of being the fat girl,” adds a third.

With the help of Dr. Younan Nowzaradan and other plastic surgeons, those 29 people will get skin removal surgery and, hopefully, will finally feel comfortable in their bodies.

“I’m one step closer to being able to live a real life,” says one woman.

My 600-Lb. Life: Skin Tight premieres March 7 at 10/9c on TLC.

Source: http://www.health.com

FDA approves new treatment for non-metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Erleada (apalutamide) for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer that has not spread (non-metastatic), but that continues to grow despite treatment with hormone therapy (castration-resistant). This is the first FDA-approved treatment for non-metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Demi Lovato Says She Quit Dieting: 'I Gained a Little Weight but I'm Happier'

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Despite what the titles of her hit singles “Confident” and “Sorry Not Sorry” might indicate, Demi Lovato struggles with body positivity like so many of her Lovatics fan base.

“It’s a daily battle. Some days I feel great and some days I don’t feel great. And sometimes it’s periods of times,” the singer, 25, tells PEOPLE. “I stopped dieting and have gained a little weight so it’s been a struggle but at the same time, I’m happier because I’m not restricting myself from certain foods and I’m no longer food shaming myself.”

Lovato, who recently launched her third capsule collaboration with Kate Hudson‘s activewear company Fabletics, told fans and social media followers in January via Twitter that she has “given up dieting and in exchange has “given up the chronic stress” of food shaming herself.

“I think that’s something in our society we get caught up in diet culture. Every commercial on TV is either about a weight loss pill or piece of fitness equipment or it’s all food-based,” says Lovato, who credits Brazilian jiu-jitsu, which she has been practicing for two years, as her go-to workout and source of empowerment.

RELATED: Demi Lovato’s Swimsuit Selfies Have Helped Her Take the Power Away from Her Online Haters

“As someone recovering from a food disorder, it’s something that I want to put out there that you don’t have to diet in order to be happy. I don’t think I’ve heard that message out there in the public and of course, it’s important to be healthy and everything in moderation is fine,” Lovato shares.

Her tweet about no longer dieting was specifically timed, according to the Tell Me You Love Me hitmaker.

“I wanted to put that message out there for other people especially with the new year coming in because it’s very triggering for people that are in recovery because everything is about weight loss,” Lovato explains.

Adding, “Because new year’s resolutions are about going to the gym and it’s really important that there’s somebody out there to speak up and say, ‘Hey your weight doesn’t define your self-worth and it definitely doesn’t define your beauty inside and out.’ ”

RELATED GALLERY: From Bikinis to Bedhead: See All of Demi Lovato’s Sexiest Social Media Snaps

After candidly discussing her eating disorder in her YouTube documentary, Simply Complicated, the Grammy nominee reveals a positive update on her recovery.

“I think every day I work towards a better version of myself. It’s recovery so I don’t think it’s something that there’s a cure or anything like that,” Lovato says. “I work towards a better life. And I’m definitely in a great place.”

RELATED: Demi Lovato Is Offering Free Mental Health Counseling to Fans on Tour: ‘I’m Here For Them’

Honest about body positivity and the own struggles with her eating disorder, Lovato is now embracing her curves with bikini and one-piece-clad selfies on social media.

“I think posting sexy pictures are so empowering and liberating,” she says about never hesitating to share sultry photos.

“Anytime you can put yourself out there the more empowering I feel. Also it doesn’t hurt when you look good and you have a good bathing suit on and then a cute guy likes your picture. Doesn’t hurt,” she shares.

Source: http://www.health.com