Monthly Archives: December 2017

What Really Happens to Your Body When You Yo-Yo Diet

Losing weight, gaining it back, then shedding pounds again can change more than just the number on the scale.

Source: http://www.health.com

This Woman Lost 77 Lbs. in a Year By Cooking With an Instant Pot Every Night

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This article originally appeared on People.com.

An Instant Pot was this woman’s one way ticket to weight loss.

At the start of this year, weighing 212 lbs., Brittany Williams decided to take control of her health by challenging herself to make dinner every night, she tells PEOPLE. The mom of three got her husband involved by having him agree to not bring takeout home for the duration of the year, and instead she decided to bust out the Instant Pot that had been lying around her house mostly untouched. She’s now down 77 lbs. since January 3 and 125 lbs. in total.

“I’ve had the Instant Pot for four years but I didn’t use it much and when I did it was for comfort foods like mac and cheese, ribs and cheesecake,” Williams, 27, says. “Starting in January I began using the Instant Pot every day—sometimes several times a day, five to six nights a week for dinner and several mornings for breakfast. I even use it to warm leftovers instead of my microwave.”

The blogger behind Instant Loss says the trendy, easy-to-use appliance that works as a pressure cooker, slow cooker, and rice cooker has made “making healthy food convenient and allowed me to succeed where I’ve failed many times before.”

Dropping the weight wasn’t all thanks to the push of a button though. Williams overhauled her diet to mirror something similar to paleo, avoiding most grains, dairy and sugar. “It’s simple. If it comes from the earth and is unprocessed, I eat it,” she writes on her blog. She loads up on vegetables and limits her fruit to avoid natural occurring sugars. 

“Eggs, meat, alternative flours (coconut, almond, and cassava), oils (coconut, avocado, and olive), nuts, seeds, and dark chocolate are some other examples of what I eat,” she says.

Williams is constantly sharing Instant Pot recipes—like dairy-free creamed corn and chickpea tacos—that not only adhere to her diet but most importantly, save time.

“There are nights I don’t start cooking dinner till 6pm because I lose track of time or we don’t get home till late, nights that I used to pull out of a frozen pizza or have my husband grab dinner on his way home from work,” she writes. “My Instant Pot has eliminated those nights. I can throw a few things in the pot and have dinner on the table in under a half hour.”

Source: http://www.health.com

Study: ‘Obesity paradox’ not present among people with new cases of cardiovascular disease

Although obesity is a well-known risk factor for getting cardiovascular disease, a controversial body of research suggests that obesity may actually be associated with improved survival among people who have cardiovascular disease.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Do These 5 Things Right Now for a Healthier Holiday Season

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I’ll only have one small glass of wine at the office holiday party. I’ll still make it to the gym three days a week. I won’t leave gift shopping until the last minute and stress myself out. These are promises plenty of us make to ourselves as the holiday season gets into full swing. And they’re promises most of us will break.

That's because it's easy for healthy intentions to go MIA when a coworker pulls together a last-minute happy hour plan, or you made yourself a way-too-long gift shopping list, or you took on another holiday-related responsibility that's throwing you off your game. 'Tis the season for excess, we know, but striving for balance and maintaining your usual healthy habits during December will also help you avoid starting the new year with a #dietstartstomorrow mentality.

To help you survive the month with your mind and body strong and begin 2018 on the right foot, we rounded up five simple things you can do right now

RELATED: 5 Ways to Ease Holiday Stress in 5 Minutes or Less

Buy a pack of gym classes

Dropping some cash ahead of time for a 10-pack of classes or one-month class pass at your favorite fitness studio may be pricey. But knowing that they're already paid for will motivate you to keep up your sweat sessions all season long—because not even a holiday cookie swap can convince you to throw money out the window. Buy them now, and you'll have a few left over to use during the first week of January, so you're inspired to follow through on your New Year's fitness resolution as well.

Get cooking

Chances are you’ll catch up with friends over drinks or brunch this month. Instead of chatting over high-calorie eggs Benedict or cocktails, connect in a setting where healthy food is the focus—like a cooking class. Book a vegetarian class for you and your girlfriend ahead of time, or make a Sunday meal prep date now, so you’ll have nutritious meal options on hand when the holidays close in. Having good-for-you eats already prepped will help make last-minute holiday cookie dough binges less likely.

RELATED: 5 Healthy Baking Swaps You Need to Try

Slim down your holiday dinner

Heading to a festive potluck? Do a little research to find recipes similar to yours that use lower-fat ingredients, Wendy Bazilian, RD, nutritionist and co-author of Eat Clean, Stay Lean, suggested in a prior interview with Health. “Even better, find a version that incorporates some healthy foods that simultaneously bump up the nutrition while reducing extra calories, sugars, or fat.”

A few swap ideas we love: If you’re tasked with bringing dip to a party, substitute protein-rich Greek yogurt for sour cream. Or cook up whipped cauliflower instead of mashed potatoes. Hey, every bit counts.

WATCH THE VIDEO: A 5-Minute Meditation to Help You Find Your Calm Now 

Subscribe to a self-care box

Treat yourself to a subscription box today that will make staying healthy through the holiday season so much easier. Sign on with a meal kit delivery service so you already know you have good-for-you meals covered, or subscribe to a beauty box ($30 for 3 months, birchbox.com) that will tame your stressed-out skin during party season. Being proactive will automatically make you feel like you’re starting December on a high note. Plus, who wants to make a last-minute drugstore run for sparkly eye shadow on New Year's Eve?

Download a meditation app

The holiday season may be the most wonderful time of the year, but it’s also the most hectic, when your usual routine falls by the wayside and family and friends you've avoided all year long come back into your life. Not surprisingly, your mental health can take a hit. To stress less this December, download one of these apps that take you through guided meditations and mindfulness exercises. We have a feeling they’ll come in handy after your family talks politics at the dinner table.

Source: http://www.health.com

Intensive weight management program can help people with type 2 diabetes achieve remission

Type 2 diabetes can be reversed following an intensive weight management program, according a randomized trial in adults who have had the condition for up to 6 years, published in The Lancet.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Binge eating can act as barrier to achieving weight-loss success

Someone who binge eats consumes an objectively large amount of food while feeling a loss of control over eating. When episodes occur weekly for several months, the action moves into the realm of binge-eating disorder.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

The One Thing Sabotaging Your Weight-Loss Goals

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When certified nutrition specialist and personal trainer Jay Nixon meets with new clients for the first time, he typically hears the same opening line: “I’ve tried everything to lose weight, but I always gain it back.” And in almost every case, the reason is the same, he says: “They didn’t change anything psychologically."

In his recent book The Overweight Mind, Nixon argues that only about 20% of weight-loss success is mechanical—or what you eat, and how often (and intensely) you exercise. The rest, he believes, is mental: “Getting a handle on [your] mindset is what leads to long-lasting results."

Psychological change might actually feel more daunting than adding an extra serving of veggies to your plate. But Nixon promises it’s easier than you think. In fact, it can be as simple as changing your vocabulary.

There are three short words he wishes everyone would ban when it comes to exercise and diet: can’t, won’t, and don’t. “Those words wrap around everything having to do with people's physical condition, to the point that they don’t even realize they’re saying [them] anymore,” he says. “They don’t have awareness around how often they use these words.”

Using them less often, he says, can have a direct impact on your fitness and weight-loss success. Here, a few examples of how you can flip the script on all that negative talk.

RELATED: How to Trick Your Brain Into Eating Less, According to an Expert in 'Gastrophysics'

"I don't like vegetables"

Nixon has found that in the context of food and fitness, people often say “don’t” because of a negative past experience. For example, if someone says he doesn't like vegetables, it could be because eating kale once made him feel sick. Or if someone says she doesn't run, it may be because she once suffered an injury from running.

When his clients use the word "don't," he reminds them that “old experience doesn’t need to dictate current behavior." Then he helps them take small steps to turn those don'ts into dos. For example, he might encourage the non-runner to simply move as quickly as she can. Odds are, after a few weeks, she'll have naturally picked up the pace.

"I can't do 10 push-ups"

“I get clients to reframe that sentence,” Nixon says. Instead of declaring you can’t do 10 push-ups, remind yourself that you can do 1 push-up. “Every day, reapply it,” he says. So the next day tell yourself, I can do two push-ups, and keep going until you hit your goal.

"I won't wake up early to work out"

People who use “won’t” in a sentence like this have convinced themselves the statement is a fact, says Nixon. But the statement only feels true because of how often the person has repeated it. Again, you need to reframe the thought: Think about what you will try–say, two early mornings a week–and then focus on how to make that behavior stick.

It can help to create a sense of accountability for yourself, Nixon suggests. “I try to get people to form a sort of community,” he explains, whether that means recruiting a workout buddy to meet you at the gym before dawn, or finding a friend on a similar path, who you can share your plans and progress with. Or if prefer to go it alone, start a journal, Nixon suggests. Even writing down what you will do in a journal can keep you honest, he says.

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These reframing tricks will help you stay on track no matter what phrase follows the word "don’t," "can't," or "won’t," Nixon says. No weight-loss journey is perfectly smooth, he points out. “When we hit roadblocks, we always fall back a little bit. But if you’re working on your psychology, you won’t fall as far.”

Source: http://www.health.com

Dangling a carrot for patients to take healthy steps: Does it work?

Patricia Alexander knew she needed a mammogram but just couldn’t find the time. “Every time I made an appointment, something would come up,” said Alexander, 53, who lives in Moreno Valley, Calif.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Blood pressure begins to decrease about 14 years before death, study finds

Blood pressure in the elderly gradually begins to decrease about 14 or so years before death, according to a new study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine.+

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Penn Medicine's first-of-its-kind app aims to enhance care for bariatric surgery patients

For many patients on the road to bariatric surgery, the process may seem daunting: track steps and exercise, record caloric and water intake, monitor sleep time, alter diet, etc. Pair this daily lifestyle management with clinic appointments, evaluations, and the stress that often comes with any kind of surgery, and patients may become too overwhelmed to move forward with their goals.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net