Monthly Archives: September 2017

Reducing antioxidant levels in the colon may have positive effect on GI inflammation

A new study finds that lowering the levels of an antioxidant in the colon has an unexpectedly positive effect on gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation. The paper is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-;Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Weight loss and its economic implications finally quantified

Weight loss has been linked to good health and it is known that maintaining a healthy body weight can lower the risk of several diseases including heart disease, diabetes, cancer etc. Reducing the burden of these diseases can also benefit the society in terms of reducing healthcare costs. However how much does losing weight benefit the community economically has never been estimated before.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Penn researchers develop predictive model to help lung cancer patients avoid ED visits

A pilot program that uses big data to predict which lung cancer patients will require a trip to an emergency department successfully anticipated a third of all ED visits over a two-week trial period, and was further able to identify which patients were at high risk and low risk of requiring such care.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Prescription drug linked to marked slowing of stomach emptying and weight loss

Liraglutide injection, a prescription medication used to treat type-2 diabetes and obesity is associated with marked slowing of stomach emptying and is an effective weight loss therapy. These are the findings of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study by Mayo Clinic researchers published today in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Injections of hunger hormone blocker can halt typical weight gain in mice

Mayo Clinic scientists have shown that injections of a hunger hormone blocker in mice can halt the typical weight gain after dieting and help prevent rebound obesity in the long term. The research findings appear in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Review finds no increased cancer risk for people taking oral diabetes medication

People taking a new oral medication for Type 2 diabetes can breathe a sigh of relief concerning suspicions they might be at an increased risk for many types of cancer, according to Indiana University researchers.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Study links distress to missed appointments and hospital admission during cancer therapy

Psychological distress has long been associated with negative health outcomes for cancer patients, though specific reasons remain unclear.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Using science to overcome challenges of maintaining long-term weight loss

Many of us are looking ahead to the holiday season and new year with lofty goals for losing weight and exercising. But how can you avoid repeating the cycle year after year?

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Diet and exercise have potential to improve chemotherapy effectiveness in pediatric cancer patients

Diet and exercise may improve treatment outcomes in pediatric cancer patients, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Children’s Cancer Hospital.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net

Intermediate dieting improves weight loss, study says

A new study conducted at the University of Tasmania suggested that avoiding continuous dieting might be the key to losing weight.

Source: http://www.news-medical.net