Artificial sweetener sucralose worsens gut inflammation in mice with Crohn's disease

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In a study that has implications for humans with inflammatory diseases, researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and colleagues have found that, given over a six-week period, the artificial sweetener sucralose, known by the brand name Splenda, worsens gut inflammation in mice with Crohn’s-like disease, but had no substantive effect on those without the condition.


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New analysis finds link between inflammatory bowel disease and history of weight loss surgery

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Gastric bypass can provide better outcomes for patients with obesity and diabetes than lifestyle intervention

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A tale of love, family conflict and battles over care for an aging mother

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Sarah Hyland Weighs 92 Lbs. and Has 49% Body Fat—but Is That Even Possible?

When it comes to understanding body weight versus BMI versus body composition, things can get confusing. Even more confusing is when the numbers don’t seem quite right, which is exactly what happened when actress Sarah Hyland stepped on the scale to determine her body composition (AKA how much of her weight is fat versus lean mass) yesterday.

“Yeah. My scale says I’m 48% fat. Soooo…how’s your Monday?” the Modern Family star captioned a photo she posted on Instagram stories last night. According to Hyland’s body composition scale, she weighs 92.8 pounds, with 49% body fat, 11% muscle, 37% water, and 3% bone. Hmm.

According to the American Council on Exercise, normal body fat percentages for women range from 10% to 31%, with a body fat percentage over 32% being considered obese. At 5’2” and 92 pounds, Hyland is anything but obese. So we had some questions.

RELATED: Kourtney Kardashian Weighs 98 Lbs. Here’s Why That’s Not Necessarily a Bad Thing

First off, is it even possible to be 92 pounds and have 49% body fat? “While it is possible to have that high of a percentage of body fat, it would be very abnormal for half of her body weight to be fat,” says Amy Rothberg, MD, director of the University of Michigan's Weight Management Clinic.

Samuel Klein, MD, director of the Center for Human Nutrition at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis agrees: “Women tend to have more body fat than men, but it's highly unlikely that she would be 92 pounds and almost 50% body fat.”

RELATED: The Number One Thing You Need to Do to Lose Weight Forever, According to Experts

It’s not surprising that Hyland’s home scale provided questionable results. According to Dr. Klein, there's so much variability in home body composition devices that they aren’t always reliable sources. Plus, body composition scales (or the regular versions, for that matter) don’t account for the distribution of fat throughout the body, which is actually just as important as the amount of fat one carries. Why? Belly fat is linked to an increased risk of metabolic diseases like diabetes and heart disease compared to fat stored in the buttocks and legs.

When assessing body fat, it's critical to consider distribution in addition to composition, says Dr. Klein: “Measuring your waist circumference, for example, will give you a better estimate of your fat distribution than stepping on a scale.”

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According to Dr. Rothberg, the most reliable way to measure body composition is with a DEXA scan or Bod Pod device, two tools that are typically found at medical centers, fitness clinics, or in research settings—not your bathroom–and use high-tech methods to compare fat tissue to lean mass.

We weren’t the only ones who were skeptical of Hyland’s home scale reading. The actress captioned her body comp score, “Definition of #skinnyfat or my scale is broken.” We’re going to guess it’s broken.